In-Person Qualitative Research

  • Traditional Qualitative
    In-person or face-to-face focus groups and depth interviews is the gold standard. Below are the qualitative research techniques we employ.
    Focus Groups
    The typical focus group consists of 8 to 10 respondents (although smaller groups are possible) and a moderator. Each session lasts from 90 to 120 minutes. The moderator creates a relaxed, open, accepting atmosphere so that the participants feel free to express their thoughts and feelings honestly. Usually, focus groups are conducted in rooms with one-way mirrors to allow clients to observe.
 

Focus groups are ideal in the early stages of research; they can be used as a problem-reduction "filter" when the questions and issues are so numerous that quantitative research is not yet feasible. The focus group is an ideal exploratory technique because of the freedom, stimulation, and spontaneity inherent in group interactions.

Sensitized Groups

Focus groups can sometimes yield richer and more insightful answers if respondents have time to think about a topic. For a sensitized group, respondents are in some way sensitized in advance to allow time for reflection upon the topic. For example, respondents may be given a list of questions several days before the group discussion, or respondents might be asked to use a specific product or visit a store before the group discussion. These "sensitized" respondents typically provide greater depth of information and more insight than regular focus group respondents.

Telegroups

Similar to an in-person focus group, the typical telegroups consists of 8 to 10 respondents (although smaller groups are possible) and a moderator. Each session lasts from 90 to 120 minutes. The moderator creates a relaxed, open, accepting atmosphere so that the participants feel free to express their thoughts and feelings honestly. The major difference with in-person groups is that the telegroup is conducted via the telephone. Respondents and the moderator can participate from their home or office. This is highly beneficial for low incidence products or for busy b2b professionals.

Dyadic And Triadic Interviews

In dyadic and triadic interviewing, two or three respondents are interviewed at the same time. This approach provides some of the interpersonal stimulation afforded by groups, yet allows the interviewer to cover topics in some depth. The dyadic or triadic design lends itself to "confrontation" techniques—users can be paired with nonusers, believers with nonbelievers, antagonists with protagonists—to uncover underlying feelings and motives.

Depth Motivational Studies

A depth motivational study typically consists of 20 to 40 depth interviews. The depth interview can be conduct in-person face-to-face or over the telephone. The qualitative interview generally lasts from 50 to 90 minutes. Usually depth interviews are tape-recorded and transcribed. The depth interview is the most powerful and comprehensive of the various qualitative techniques. Depth interviews are used primarily to address motivational questions, particularly if unconscious motives are thought to be important. Depth interviews are used when the topic is extremely complicated and much time is needed to cover all the questions. Depth interviews are especially useful for sensitive topics that could not be discussed freely in a group setting.

Experienced Qualitative Consultants

Decision Analyst has over 3 decades of qualitative research experience and is one of the pioneers in adapting qualitative research to the Internet. Our moderators can recommend the qualitative technique (online or in-person) best suited to your research needs.

For more information on our Qualitative Research services, please contact Clay Dethloff, Senior Vice President (cdethloff@decisionanalyst.com), or call 1-800-ANALYSIS (262-5974) or 1-817-640-6166.